Reader Poll: Do Financial Reports Affect Your Perception of a Race?

Money-bagIt’s that time of the year again. It’s quarterly campaign finance report season!

Every three months, campaigns throughout the country are required to reveal their finance reports to the Federal Election Commission (FEC).

These numbers, particularly in congressional races, are considered a major sign of a candidate’s viability and the conventional wisdom is that a fiscal report can make or break a candidate.

But is the conventional wisdom right or do we over-rate the impact money has in politics?

To find out, we decided to ask you our readers whether financial reports affect the way you view a race. Do they make you more or less likely to volunteer or give money yourself? Do reports shift your attention away from some races to other races with closer money totals? Basically, we’re asking do they in any way change your opinion about an election.

Do financial reports affect your perception of a race?


  • Yes, they are a good indicator of where the campaign currently stands (59%)
  • No, they have absolutely nothing to do with the quality of the candidates (41%)

Total Voters: 322

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July 15th, 2014 | Posted in Front Page Stories, Poll, Top Stories | 4 Comments

4 thoughts on “Reader Poll: Do Financial Reports Affect Your Perception of a Race?”

  1. Happy Valley says:

    This is not a yes or no issue.
    Money is a key factor, but having money is no predictor that the money will be spent effectively.
    If the candidate is smart and has great grass roots, having a little less money can be overcome.
    But if the money gap is a chasm, that says other important things are wrong.

  2. Observer says:

    Mostly tells you who is on the take, and if they haven’t even held any public fundraisers, who owes the most favors in return for cash. Other countries call that Bribery, but SCOTUS calls it Freedom of Speech.

  3. Sue says:

    I care a lot more about the source of the money than its amount!

  4. Only perception of likely winner, not necessarily who would do a better job.

Comments are closed.