Reader Poll: What Should Pennsylvania’s Minimum Wage Be in 2020?

Pennsylvania’s minimum wage has been the federal minimum rate of $7.25 an hour for the past decade, but the conversation of possibly raising the wage has take center stage this week.

On Monday, Senate Majority Leader Jake Corman (R-Centre) said that he thinks “the minimum wage discussion needs to happen,” although he stated that Gov. Tom Wolf’s proposal was unreasonable.

Last month, Wolf proposed raising the wage to $12 an hour on July 1, 2019, while the rate gradually increases by 50 cents until it reaches $15 an hour in 2025.

After Corman made his call for a possible compromise, Wolf stated he believes his plan is the best for workers, although he’d be open to welcoming a discussion with the legislature, according to the Pennsylvania Capital-Star.

During the most recent gubernatorial race, GOP candidate Scott Wagner said he would support a $9.50 an hour minimum wage.

With the Governor and Senate Majority Leader talking about possibly changing the current rate, what do you think the minimum wage rate should be in 2020?

Reader Poll: What Should Pennsylvania’s Minimum Wage Be in 2020?


  • $12 (59%)
  • $9.50 (25%)
  • $7.25 (17%)

Total Voters: 593

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February 27th, 2019 | Posted in Front Page Stories, Harrisburg, Poll, Top Stories | 18 Comments

18 thoughts on “Reader Poll: What Should Pennsylvania’s Minimum Wage Be in 2020?”

  1. Show Me The Money says:

    Why Not make it 1000 Dollars an Hour

  2. Linda Bahner says:

    $15 would be better, but it wasn’t on the poll…

  3. Patricia McNamara says:

    Signed for the $12. Should be $20 Now! Or roll back prices and stop the runaway inflation. People can’t afford to live and function in society with $12 or even $15 somewhere down the pike. The politicians need to recognize a lot of the craziness in the country is from the stress. People are pushed and get mean. Wake up or we will throw you out of office. The struggle is real. Thank You

  4. Donna says:

    I chose 12.00 because 15 wasn’t an option.

  5. Senatore says:

    Gotta agree with post “Wages are set by how little your employer thinks they can get away with. And if there is no union, wage law, or tax structure set to ensure otherwise, wages will keep falling.” Taxpayers are paying under-paid employees with taxes that fund safety-net programs (food, health) so what is the hourly wage that would raise yearly income above the poverty level that triggers help? Instead of paying tax funding a bureaucracy to administer safety-net we’d pay more for purchases so that employers can pay a living wage TIED TO INFLATION.

  6. StevenTodd says:

    I couldn’t answer because $15 was not on there. It should be $15 now.

    1. Confused says:

      Exactly! $15 is literally in the headline. Wth?

  7. Vito says:

    Tying wage growth to the GDP sounds as if it is a good idea.

  8. Joseph Facchiano says:

    A minimum wage is a farce. It is nothing more than a politician’s way of buying votes with other peoples’ money. There is no economic value to it. Forcing businesses to increase wages will also force those businesses to raise prices.
    In the end, there is no more buying power for the people at minimum wage and there is less buying power for everyone else.
    Any politician who supports minimum wage increases either doesn’t understand basic economics or is corrupt,,, or both.

    1. Jared Shoemaker Jr says:

      SPoken like a person who’s had to work as little as possible. That silver spoon taste good?

  9. Chris S. says:

    First, seems like “$15” should at least be an option… or “Other”.

    Second, if the minimum wage had kept pace with per capita GDP growth since 1973, then it would be $21/hour now. I would accept $15 at a start, though.

    1. Ahem... says:

      Or maybe that is illustrative of how ridiculous having GDP growth tied to minimum wage.

      1. Chris S. says:

        That is how we measure the value of production. The lie that’s been sold to people over the last 40 years is that new economy jobs are “less valuable” than old economy jobs. The reality is that, while not all industries have seen the same growth, the real value of economic production for every person living in the country has more than doubled. If it were true that wages were set “by the market” like the Club for Growth, Americans for Prosperity, and all corporate-owned Republicans and Democrats like to say, then you would expect that hourly wages for non-management workers would have grown at a rate that averages out in the direction of production growth. Instead they have declines. In 1973, the average hourly wage for a non-management worker was around $20/hour in 2017 value. In 2017, the same figure was less than $18/hour. If it had kept pace with GDP, then it would be around $40.hour. At the same time, earned income for the top 5 percent has tripled, while total annual earnings have increased by even higher percentages.

        Wages are set by how little your employer thinks they can get away with. And if there is no union, wage law, or tax structure set to ensure otherwise, wages will keep falling.

        1. Ahem... says:

          We measure the value of production by the minimum wage? I have never read or heard that. Minimum wage jobs are for high school kids. Not family sustaining jobs and they shouldn’t be encouraged to be. Flipping burgers or folding clothes is not a career, its what you do while you work to improve your position. Your entire point, although worth the read, is inaccurate – although I apologize if I have misunderstood.

          1. JOHN LANGLEY says:

            Unfortunately those burger flipping jobs and clothes folding jobs are career jobs for some. Have you ever heard of people working two and three jobs to support their family? Their should be a way for advancement in these low paying jobs. Business owners who give raises for value are rare. In most cases employers have to forced or coerced into raising wages. Wages in PA. should be $12.75 to start and after two years jump to $15.00.

          2. Joe Bitzer says:

            Only 8% of workers who receive minimum wage in my area are younger than 19. 45% are over the age of 40. 51% have some college education. 66% work full time. Many families rely on their teenagers working to help support the family. Especially single moms. Why should we not try and lift people out of poverty? Our government doesn’t seem to mind giving tax breaks to companies making billions in profit but heaven forbid if we suggest anything that helps the poor. It is disgusting and shameful.

    2. Peter Lemonjello says:

      Why 1973 as your starting point? Why not 1938 when it was established. Which would equate to $4.78 today.

      1. Germanicus says:

        Fake stats

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