Fitzpatrick and Boockvar Debate Predominated by Tax Policy

Incumbent Mike Fitzpatrick and opponent Kathy Boockvar faced off in the first of three debates on Thursday.  While many issues were in contention, the main focal points of the debate were the differences in their opinions with respect to tax policy and Medicare expenditure.

Boockvar attacked her opponent’s support of the Bush era tax cuts and the Ryan budget, which she fiercely opponent called out, claiming they “added more to our deficit than the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan combined” and would put the burden on the shoulders of the nation’s children.

Fitzpatrick did not take this attack lightly, however, and fired back on his opponent’s lack of specificity on whether or not she supports the Obama administration’s tax plan.  This plan would result in a tax increase on individuals making $200,000 or families making $250,000.  Fitzpatrick questioned this plan, declaring it would threaten over one million small businesses and calling it a “tax on Bucks County families”.

Healthcare was no small part of the discussion.  Fitzpatrick attacked the $716 billion he said the Affordable Care Act cut from Medicare, to which Boockvar quickly countered, explaining that the ACA saves money for the country by “changing how providers are paid”.  She also noted that the Ryan Budget, which Mike Fitzpatrick voted for, also cuts $716 billion dollars from Medicare.

The fifty minute debate was heard on WNPV-1440 AM radio last Thursday, but is also available on the station’s website.  The remaining debates are at 11 a.m. Thursday at the Lower Bucks campus of Bucks County Community College, in Bristol, and finally on Friday at 8 to 9:30 a.m., Oct. 26 at the Waterwheel Restaurant in Plumstead.

October 22nd, 2012 | Posted in Congress, Front Page Stories, Top Stories | 1 Comment

One thought on “Fitzpatrick and Boockvar Debate Predominated by Tax Policy”

  1. The contrast between referenced-data citation [by Fitz] and broad-brush promising [by Boock] was stark, both regarding the politics of campaigning and the policies in D.C.

    He refuted her claim that the House has been ineffective, noting “a whole host of bills” that have stalled in the D-controlled Senate; when she called for ending the Bush tax-cuts, Mike noted that this would hurt small business [citing BHO/Clinton noting the mistake in raising taxes amidst a Recession].

    And when she discussed the debt, she neglected to note the enhancement thereof by BHO [from ~$10T to ~$16T]; counter-intuitively, she claimed that 98% of small businesses wouldn’t be affected by “ending tax cuts on the wealthiest 1% of Americans.”

    Fitz also noted the need to avoid burdensome regulations would be addressed by his proposed oversight-bill; she claimed his statements were “mostly inaccurate” without citing an example.

    She wanted to ensure ObamaCare doesn’t become burdensome, but failed to state how this might be accomplished [“fixed”]; instead, she launched into unspecified projections regarding the need to cut “wasteful administrative costs” without recognizing how it suppresses hiring.

    He noted that promises weren’t kept [“It’s not a tax, it’s not going to increase premiums, it’s not going to force people to change their insurers”] and expressed support for some elements thereof [prevention, age-26, pre-existing illness]; meanwhile, he cited the GOP’s counterproposal [interstate competition, equal tax deduction, etc.].

    {He corrected her when she claimed he supported “the first 500 pages of ObamaCare”; he said he supported THE CONSUMER PROTECTIONS therein.}

    {He also specified key-issues regarding what she has refused to oppose [the $716B cut to Medicare and the creation of the Independent Reimbursement Advisory Board]; in contrast, she attacked him repeatedly for supporting the (radical) Ryan Budget.}

    {He also noted the negative impact on “access” when provider reimbursement is to be cut via BHO; she evaded uttering specific refutations of the more onerous aspects thereof.}

    The Closing Statements were nondescript, with Boock seeking unity and Fitz focused on BHO’s failures [jobs, gas-prices].

    BTW, the podcast of the debate ends @ 47-minutes.

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