Category: Reproductive Rights

A trio of Pennsylvania female politicians from the U.S. House, the Pennsylvania Senate and the City of Scranton held a virtual press conference on Thursday to blast Mehmet Oz for his “local politicians” comment in Tuesday’s debate.

Congresswoman Madeleine Dean (D-Montgomery), State Senator Amanda Cappelletti (D-Montgomery), and Scranton Mayor Paige Cognetti spoke for more than 30 minutes, sharing personal thoughts and experiences.

After being asked whether he would support a nationwide abortion ban, Oz said on Tuesday: “There should not be involvement from the federal government in how states decide their abortion decisions. As a physician, I’ve been in the room when there’s some difficult conversations happening. I don’t want the federal government involved with that at all.

“I want women, doctors, local political leaders, letting the democracy that’s always allowed our nation to thrive to put the best ideas forward so states can decide for themselves.”

“That sent chills up my spine,” said Dean, the 4th District congresswoman.

Cappelletti shared her personal experience of having two miscarriages and that she is 20 weeks pregnant. “Who do I want in that room with me,” she asked rhetorically. “I don’t need a real estate politician, a lawyer politician, no one who is not privy to my medical information. It’s you. You have a right to your bodily autonomy. Not your doctor. Not your partner. Not your faith leader. The decision lies with you.”

“What I need is support. Oz doesn’t think I have that right to make the decision on my own. Mr. Oz doesn’t trust people with uteruses to make decision by themselves. John Fetterman believes that women are capable of making their own decisions. I’m on the side of the person that believes I can.”

Cognetti spoke of her role as a local political leader, noting that she “has no business being in your doctor’s appointment. It’s healthcare. Abortion is healthcare. The types of policies and laws that Doug Mastriano and Mehmet Oz want will hurt both Amanda and myself as we enter our pregnancies. We have to keep chipping away at the state senate and house. The vast majority doesn’t want to see abortion care go away. The more members that get that, the better off we are.”

Recent polls have seen reproductive rights slide on issues that voters think would most impact their decisions on Election Day, as pocketbook issues have soared to the top of surveys.

“That’s not what I’m hearing on the ground when I knock on doors,” said Dean. “Obviously, the economy is important as is gun violence. Candidates must be judged on all of these issues.”

“My daughter will not have the same rights that I had. That’s terrifying,” said Cappelletti. “Downright bone-chilling. I know what polls are saying. I don’t agree with what they’re representing.”

Cognetti added that she thought the polls were not reflective of the entire electorate with polling skewed toward voters that are not of child-bearing age or ability.

Dean talked about the makeup of the General Assembly and how important it is for Democrats to make headway in state legislative races.

“I served in the Pennsylvania House for nearly six years,” she said. “I saw the play in motion. White men are 30 percent of the population and 62 percent of those representing us. What Oz revealed is the talking points of letting it go back to the states. If you want to make this local, go local to the woman. That’s how local it is.”

“We believe that Roe v. Wade was settled law and established rights and limitations for women and girls. We’re not going back. Abortion on demand is a radical talking point to make everyone afraid of it.”

“Roe was the law of the land. Our rights here in Pennsylvania are still protected. An unjust ruling is no ruling at all.”

A trio of Pennsylvania female politicians from the U.S. House, the Pennsylvania Senate and the City of Scranton held a virtual press conference on Thursday to blast Mehmet Oz for his “local politicians” comment in Tuesday’s debate.

Congresswoman Madeleine Dean (D-Montgomery), State Senator Amanda Cappelletti (D-Montgomery), and Scranton Mayor Paige Cognetti spoke for more than 30 minutes, sharing personal thoughts and experiences.

After being asked whether he would support a nationwide abortion ban, Oz said on Tuesday: “There should not be involvement from the federal government in how states decide their abortion decisions. As a physician, I’ve been in the room when there’s some difficult conversations happening. I don’t want the federal government involved with that at all.

“I want women, doctors, local political leaders, letting the democracy that’s always allowed our nation to thrive to put the best ideas forward so states can decide for themselves.”

“That sent chills up my spine,” said Dean, the 4th District congresswoman.

Cappelletti shared her personal experience of having two miscarriages and that she is 20 weeks pregnant. “Who do I want in that room with me,” she asked rhetorically. “I don’t need a real estate politician, a lawyer politician, no one who is not privy to my medical information. It’s you. You have a right to your bodily autonomy. Not your doctor. Not your partner. Not your faith leader. The decision lies with you.”

“What I need is support. Oz doesn’t think I have that right to make the decision on my own. Mr. Oz doesn’t trust people with uteruses to make decision by themselves. John Fetterman believes that women are capable of making their own decisions. I’m on the side of the person that believes I can.”

Cognetti spoke of her role as a local political leader, noting that she “has no business being in your doctor’s appointment. It’s healthcare. Abortion is healthcare. The types of policies and laws that Doug Mastriano and Mehmet Oz want will hurt both Amanda and myself as we enter our pregnancies. We have to keep chipping away at the state senate and house. The vast majority doesn’t want to see abortion care go away. The more members that get that, the better off we are.”

Recent polls have seen reproductive rights slide on issues that voters think would most impact their decisions on Election Day, as pocketbook issues have soared to the top of surveys.

“That’s not what I’m hearing on the ground when I knock on doors,” said Dean. “Obviously, the economy is important as is gun violence. Candidates must be judged on all of these issues.”

“My daughter will not have the same rights that I had. That’s terrifying,” said Cappelletti. “Downright bone-chilling. I know what polls are saying. I don’t agree with what they’re representing.”

Cognetti added that she thought the polls were not reflective of the entire electorate with polling skewed toward voters that are not of child-bearing age or ability.

Dean talked about the makeup of the General Assembly and how important it is for Democrats to make headway in state legislative races.

“I served in the Pennsylvania House for nearly six years,” she said. “I saw the play in motion. White men are 30 percent of the population and 62 percent of those representing us. What Oz revealed is the talking points of letting it go back to the states. If you want to make this local, go local to the woman. That’s how local it is.”

“We believe that Roe v. Wade was settled law and established rights and limitations for women and girls. We’re not going back. Abortion on demand is a radical talking point to make everyone afraid of it.”

“Roe was the law of the land. Our rights here in Pennsylvania are still protected. An unjust ruling is no ruling at all.”

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A trio of Pennsylvania female politicians from the U.S. House, the Pennsylvania Senate and the City of Scranton held a virtual press conference on Thursday to blast Mehmet Oz for his “local politicians” comment in Tuesday’s debate.

Congresswoman Madeleine Dean (D-Montgomery), State Senator Amanda Cappelletti (D-Montgomery), and Scranton Mayor Paige Cognetti spoke for more than 30 minutes, sharing personal thoughts and experiences.

After being asked whether he would support a nationwide abortion ban, Oz said on Tuesday: “There should not be involvement from the federal government in how states decide their abortion decisions. As a physician, I’ve been in the room when there’s some difficult conversations happening. I don’t want the federal government involved with that at all.

“I want women, doctors, local political leaders, letting the democracy that’s always allowed our nation to thrive to put the best ideas forward so states can decide for themselves.”

“That sent chills up my spine,” said Dean, the 4th District congresswoman.

Cappelletti shared her personal experience of having two miscarriages and that she is 20 weeks pregnant. “Who do I want in that room with me,” she asked rhetorically. “I don’t need a real estate politician, a lawyer politician, no one who is not privy to my medical information. It’s you. You have a right to your bodily autonomy. Not your doctor. Not your partner. Not your faith leader. The decision lies with you.”

“What I need is support. Oz doesn’t think I have that right to make the decision on my own. Mr. Oz doesn’t trust people with uteruses to make decision by themselves. John Fetterman believes that women are capable of making their own decisions. I’m on the side of the person that believes I can.”

Cognetti spoke of her role as a local political leader, noting that she “has no business being in your doctor’s appointment. It’s healthcare. Abortion is healthcare. The types of policies and laws that Doug Mastriano and Mehmet Oz want will hurt both Amanda and myself as we enter our pregnancies. We have to keep chipping away at the state senate and house. The vast majority doesn’t want to see abortion care go away. The more members that get that, the better off we are.”

Recent polls have seen reproductive rights slide on issues that voters think would most impact their decisions on Election Day, as pocketbook issues have soared to the top of surveys.

“That’s not what I’m hearing on the ground when I knock on doors,” said Dean. “Obviously, the economy is important as is gun violence. Candidates must be judged on all of these issues.”

“My daughter will not have the same rights that I had. That’s terrifying,” said Cappelletti. “Downright bone-chilling. I know what polls are saying. I don’t agree with what they’re representing.”

Cognetti added that she thought the polls were not reflective of the entire electorate with polling skewed toward voters that are not of child-bearing age or ability.

Dean talked about the makeup of the General Assembly and how important it is for Democrats to make headway in state legislative races.

“I served in the Pennsylvania House for nearly six years,” she said. “I saw the play in motion. White men are 30 percent of the population and 62 percent of those representing us. What Oz revealed is the talking points of letting it go back to the states. If you want to make this local, go local to the woman. That’s how local it is.”

“We believe that Roe v. Wade was settled law and established rights and limitations for women and girls. We’re not going back. Abortion on demand is a radical talking point to make everyone afraid of it.”

“Roe was the law of the land. Our rights here in Pennsylvania are still protected. An unjust ruling is no ruling at all.”

A trio of Pennsylvania female politicians from the U.S. House, the Pennsylvania Senate and the City of Scranton held a virtual press conference on Thursday to blast Mehmet Oz for his “local politicians” comment in Tuesday’s debate.

Congresswoman Madeleine Dean (D-Montgomery), State Senator Amanda Cappelletti (D-Montgomery), and Scranton Mayor Paige Cognetti spoke for more than 30 minutes, sharing personal thoughts and experiences.

After being asked whether he would support a nationwide abortion ban, Oz said on Tuesday: “There should not be involvement from the federal government in how states decide their abortion decisions. As a physician, I’ve been in the room when there’s some difficult conversations happening. I don’t want the federal government involved with that at all.

“I want women, doctors, local political leaders, letting the democracy that’s always allowed our nation to thrive to put the best ideas forward so states can decide for themselves.”

“That sent chills up my spine,” said Dean, the 4th District congresswoman.

Cappelletti shared her personal experience of having two miscarriages and that she is 20 weeks pregnant. “Who do I want in that room with me,” she asked rhetorically. “I don’t need a real estate politician, a lawyer politician, no one who is not privy to my medical information. It’s you. You have a right to your bodily autonomy. Not your doctor. Not your partner. Not your faith leader. The decision lies with you.”

“What I need is support. Oz doesn’t think I have that right to make the decision on my own. Mr. Oz doesn’t trust people with uteruses to make decision by themselves. John Fetterman believes that women are capable of making their own decisions. I’m on the side of the person that believes I can.”

Cognetti spoke of her role as a local political leader, noting that she “has no business being in your doctor’s appointment. It’s healthcare. Abortion is healthcare. The types of policies and laws that Doug Mastriano and Mehmet Oz want will hurt both Amanda and myself as we enter our pregnancies. We have to keep chipping away at the state senate and house. The vast majority doesn’t want to see abortion care go away. The more members that get that, the better off we are.”

Recent polls have seen reproductive rights slide on issues that voters think would most impact their decisions on Election Day, as pocketbook issues have soared to the top of surveys.

“That’s not what I’m hearing on the ground when I knock on doors,” said Dean. “Obviously, the economy is important as is gun violence. Candidates must be judged on all of these issues.”

“My daughter will not have the same rights that I had. That’s terrifying,” said Cappelletti. “Downright bone-chilling. I know what polls are saying. I don’t agree with what they’re representing.”

Cognetti added that she thought the polls were not reflective of the entire electorate with polling skewed toward voters that are not of child-bearing age or ability.

Dean talked about the makeup of the General Assembly and how important it is for Democrats to make headway in state legislative races.

“I served in the Pennsylvania House for nearly six years,” she said. “I saw the play in motion. White men are 30 percent of the population and 62 percent of those representing us. What Oz revealed is the talking points of letting it go back to the states. If you want to make this local, go local to the woman. That’s how local it is.”

“We believe that Roe v. Wade was settled law and established rights and limitations for women and girls. We’re not going back. Abortion on demand is a radical talking point to make everyone afraid of it.”

“Roe was the law of the land. Our rights here in Pennsylvania are still protected. An unjust ruling is no ruling at all.”

  • When Will PA House Agree On Rules?


    • After the Special House Elections (Feb 7) (92%)
    • End of the Month (Jan 31) (4%)
    • End of Next Week (Jan 27) (2%)
    • Early February (Feb 1-6) (2%)

    Total Voters: 152

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