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Tag: Auditor General

While the final total in the Democratic contest for the nomination for Auditor General appears decisive, a look at a map that shows the counties won by each candidate reveals a great deal about the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Philadelphia state Rep. Malcolm Kenyatta defeated Lehigh County controller Mark Pinsley, 65-35%, and by nearly 300,000 votes. That said, Kenyatta, who ran an unsuccessful campaign for the Democratic nomination for U.S. Senate in 2022, only received a plurality of votes from 17 of the state’s 67 counties with one ending in a tie, according to unofficial numbers from the Department of State.

Kenyatta was able to roll up huge margins in Philadelphia and Allegheny County, as well as the southeastern so-called collar counties of Montgomery, Delaware and Bucks. He banked margins of 128,000 in Philadelphia, 49,000 in Montgomery, 48,000 in Allegheny, 34K in Delaware and 21K in Bucks. Added together – those five provided a 280,000-vote padding that elevated Kenyatta to the nomination.

Showing why such maps are flawed and that land mass does not equate to voters, Pinsley had the advantage in 49 counties, including a 75-25% difference in his home county. But that only added a buffer of 13,000 votes, while neighboring Northampton also went for Pinsley by a large percentage, but provided him with just an additional 6,200 votes.

Below is an interactive map showing the counties’ percentages for each candidate. Kenyatta will meet incumbent Tim DeFoor in the general election in November.

While the final total in the Democratic contest for the nomination for Auditor General appears decisive, a look at a map that shows the counties won by each candidate reveals a great deal about the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Philadelphia state Rep. Malcolm Kenyatta defeated Lehigh County controller Mark Pinsley, 65-35%, and by nearly 300,000 votes. That said, Kenyatta, who ran an unsuccessful campaign for the Democratic nomination for U.S. Senate in 2022, only received a plurality of votes from 17 of the state’s 67 counties with one ending in a tie, according to unofficial numbers from the Department of State.

Kenyatta was able to roll up huge margins in Philadelphia and Allegheny County, as well as the southeastern so-called collar counties of Montgomery, Delaware and Bucks. He banked margins of 128,000 in Philadelphia, 49,000 in Montgomery, 48,000 in Allegheny, 34K in Delaware and 21K in Bucks. Added together – those five provided a 280,000-vote padding that elevated Kenyatta to the nomination.

Showing why such maps are flawed and that land mass does not equate to voters, Pinsley had the advantage in 49 counties, including a 75-25% difference in his home county. But that only added a buffer of 13,000 votes, while neighboring Northampton also went for Pinsley by a large percentage, but provided him with just an additional 6,200 votes.

Below is an interactive map showing the counties’ percentages for each candidate. Kenyatta will meet incumbent Tim DeFoor in the general election in November.

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While the final total in the Democratic contest for the nomination for Auditor General appears decisive, a look at a map that shows the counties won by each candidate reveals a great deal about the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Philadelphia state Rep. Malcolm Kenyatta defeated Lehigh County controller Mark Pinsley, 65-35%, and by nearly 300,000 votes. That said, Kenyatta, who ran an unsuccessful campaign for the Democratic nomination for U.S. Senate in 2022, only received a plurality of votes from 17 of the state’s 67 counties with one ending in a tie, according to unofficial numbers from the Department of State.

Kenyatta was able to roll up huge margins in Philadelphia and Allegheny County, as well as the southeastern so-called collar counties of Montgomery, Delaware and Bucks. He banked margins of 128,000 in Philadelphia, 49,000 in Montgomery, 48,000 in Allegheny, 34K in Delaware and 21K in Bucks. Added together – those five provided a 280,000-vote padding that elevated Kenyatta to the nomination.

Showing why such maps are flawed and that land mass does not equate to voters, Pinsley had the advantage in 49 counties, including a 75-25% difference in his home county. But that only added a buffer of 13,000 votes, while neighboring Northampton also went for Pinsley by a large percentage, but provided him with just an additional 6,200 votes.

Below is an interactive map showing the counties’ percentages for each candidate. Kenyatta will meet incumbent Tim DeFoor in the general election in November.

While the final total in the Democratic contest for the nomination for Auditor General appears decisive, a look at a map that shows the counties won by each candidate reveals a great deal about the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

Philadelphia state Rep. Malcolm Kenyatta defeated Lehigh County controller Mark Pinsley, 65-35%, and by nearly 300,000 votes. That said, Kenyatta, who ran an unsuccessful campaign for the Democratic nomination for U.S. Senate in 2022, only received a plurality of votes from 17 of the state’s 67 counties with one ending in a tie, according to unofficial numbers from the Department of State.

Kenyatta was able to roll up huge margins in Philadelphia and Allegheny County, as well as the southeastern so-called collar counties of Montgomery, Delaware and Bucks. He banked margins of 128,000 in Philadelphia, 49,000 in Montgomery, 48,000 in Allegheny, 34K in Delaware and 21K in Bucks. Added together – those five provided a 280,000-vote padding that elevated Kenyatta to the nomination.

Showing why such maps are flawed and that land mass does not equate to voters, Pinsley had the advantage in 49 counties, including a 75-25% difference in his home county. But that only added a buffer of 13,000 votes, while neighboring Northampton also went for Pinsley by a large percentage, but provided him with just an additional 6,200 votes.

Below is an interactive map showing the counties’ percentages for each candidate. Kenyatta will meet incumbent Tim DeFoor in the general election in November.

  • Does the NYC Verdict Make You More or Less Likely to Vote For Trump in 2024?


    • Less Likely (36%)
    • More Likely (34%)
    • Makes No Difference (30%)

    Total Voters: 112

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