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“Our caucus’ focus is making sure it’s a responsible product for the taxpayers on this Commonwealth. So we’re not wedded to June 30.”

With that statement, Senate Majority Leader Joe Pittman (R-Armstrong / Indiana / Jefferson / Westmoreland) laid out the GOP roadmap to adopting a budget for 2023-24 at a Pennsylvania Press Club luncheon in Harrisburg.

He did not commit to that being accomplished by June 30, noting that it could be “before June 30, on June 30, or after June 30.”

Pittman, who was elected to his leadership position in January, covered numerous topics in his 25-minute address and Q-and-A session.

He tipped his cap to Gov. Josh Shapiro for delivering a “fairly reasonable budget product.” Pittman pointed out away of concern and disagreement with the chief among them the sheer “magnitude of expenditure” at $44.4 billion.

While expressing optimism that his caucus can work with Shapiro to find common ground, he made it clear that he is not in agreement with a plan that empties the $13 billion rainy day fund by 2027 or 2028.

“We must recognize that [the budget surplus] are one-time dollars and need to be treated as such,” he said.

“There is a red flashing light – and that red flashing light is the real estate transfer tax,” Pittman said. “The revenues that have come in from real estate transfer taxes have plummeted. To me, that’s a sign of recession times to come.”

Even with divided government in Harrisburg as Democrats claim the governor’s mansion and hold the majority in the House, Pittman said that the Senate Republican caucus “claims an electoral mandate” due to its 28-22 advantage in numbers. “It’s apparent to me that (we) will find a way to solve problems and advance the betterment of Pennsylvanians.”

He answered questions regarding the labor force, election reform, constitutional amendments, marijuana and abortion.

“We have a crisis in the labor force,” said the 46-year-old Republican. “It has shrunk dramatically. We need to reengage able body individuals into the work force. The issue is much deeper than just a select subset of employees asking the rest to subsidize tax credits through their work,” referring to Shapiro’s plan for teachers, nurses and police.

“It is undeniable that a large segment (of Commonwealth voters) does not have faith in the current process,” he said when asked about counties’ desire to have expanded time to precanvass ballots.

He said that his top priorities were transportation, bringing a budget to the table that is balanced and responsible, and an energy policy that common ground could be found upon.

Pittman also delivered a line that brought chuckles from the crowd, noting how difficult it is to represent a region of the state that has Punxsutawney Phil as one of his constituents.

“Our caucus’ focus is making sure it’s a responsible product for the taxpayers on this Commonwealth. So we’re not wedded to June 30.”

With that statement, Senate Majority Leader Joe Pittman (R-Armstrong / Indiana / Jefferson / Westmoreland) laid out the GOP roadmap to adopting a budget for 2023-24 at a Pennsylvania Press Club luncheon in Harrisburg.

He did not commit to that being accomplished by June 30, noting that it could be “before June 30, on June 30, or after June 30.”

Pittman, who was elected to his leadership position in January, covered numerous topics in his 25-minute address and Q-and-A session.

He tipped his cap to Gov. Josh Shapiro for delivering a “fairly reasonable budget product.” Pittman pointed out away of concern and disagreement with the chief among them the sheer “magnitude of expenditure” at $44.4 billion.

While expressing optimism that his caucus can work with Shapiro to find common ground, he made it clear that he is not in agreement with a plan that empties the $13 billion rainy day fund by 2027 or 2028.

“We must recognize that [the budget surplus] are one-time dollars and need to be treated as such,” he said.

“There is a red flashing light – and that red flashing light is the real estate transfer tax,” Pittman said. “The revenues that have come in from real estate transfer taxes have plummeted. To me, that’s a sign of recession times to come.”

Even with divided government in Harrisburg as Democrats claim the governor’s mansion and hold the majority in the House, Pittman said that the Senate Republican caucus “claims an electoral mandate” due to its 28-22 advantage in numbers. “It’s apparent to me that (we) will find a way to solve problems and advance the betterment of Pennsylvanians.”

He answered questions regarding the labor force, election reform, constitutional amendments, marijuana and abortion.

“We have a crisis in the labor force,” said the 46-year-old Republican. “It has shrunk dramatically. We need to reengage able body individuals into the work force. The issue is much deeper than just a select subset of employees asking the rest to subsidize tax credits through their work,” referring to Shapiro’s plan for teachers, nurses and police.

“It is undeniable that a large segment (of Commonwealth voters) does not have faith in the current process,” he said when asked about counties’ desire to have expanded time to precanvass ballots.

He said that his top priorities were transportation, bringing a budget to the table that is balanced and responsible, and an energy policy that common ground could be found upon.

Pittman also delivered a line that brought chuckles from the crowd, noting how difficult it is to represent a region of the state that has Punxsutawney Phil as one of his constituents.

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“Our caucus’ focus is making sure it’s a responsible product for the taxpayers on this Commonwealth. So we’re not wedded to June 30.”

With that statement, Senate Majority Leader Joe Pittman (R-Armstrong / Indiana / Jefferson / Westmoreland) laid out the GOP roadmap to adopting a budget for 2023-24 at a Pennsylvania Press Club luncheon in Harrisburg.

He did not commit to that being accomplished by June 30, noting that it could be “before June 30, on June 30, or after June 30.”

Pittman, who was elected to his leadership position in January, covered numerous topics in his 25-minute address and Q-and-A session.

He tipped his cap to Gov. Josh Shapiro for delivering a “fairly reasonable budget product.” Pittman pointed out away of concern and disagreement with the chief among them the sheer “magnitude of expenditure” at $44.4 billion.

While expressing optimism that his caucus can work with Shapiro to find common ground, he made it clear that he is not in agreement with a plan that empties the $13 billion rainy day fund by 2027 or 2028.

“We must recognize that [the budget surplus] are one-time dollars and need to be treated as such,” he said.

“There is a red flashing light – and that red flashing light is the real estate transfer tax,” Pittman said. “The revenues that have come in from real estate transfer taxes have plummeted. To me, that’s a sign of recession times to come.”

Even with divided government in Harrisburg as Democrats claim the governor’s mansion and hold the majority in the House, Pittman said that the Senate Republican caucus “claims an electoral mandate” due to its 28-22 advantage in numbers. “It’s apparent to me that (we) will find a way to solve problems and advance the betterment of Pennsylvanians.”

He answered questions regarding the labor force, election reform, constitutional amendments, marijuana and abortion.

“We have a crisis in the labor force,” said the 46-year-old Republican. “It has shrunk dramatically. We need to reengage able body individuals into the work force. The issue is much deeper than just a select subset of employees asking the rest to subsidize tax credits through their work,” referring to Shapiro’s plan for teachers, nurses and police.

“It is undeniable that a large segment (of Commonwealth voters) does not have faith in the current process,” he said when asked about counties’ desire to have expanded time to precanvass ballots.

He said that his top priorities were transportation, bringing a budget to the table that is balanced and responsible, and an energy policy that common ground could be found upon.

Pittman also delivered a line that brought chuckles from the crowd, noting how difficult it is to represent a region of the state that has Punxsutawney Phil as one of his constituents.

“Our caucus’ focus is making sure it’s a responsible product for the taxpayers on this Commonwealth. So we’re not wedded to June 30.”

With that statement, Senate Majority Leader Joe Pittman (R-Armstrong / Indiana / Jefferson / Westmoreland) laid out the GOP roadmap to adopting a budget for 2023-24 at a Pennsylvania Press Club luncheon in Harrisburg.

He did not commit to that being accomplished by June 30, noting that it could be “before June 30, on June 30, or after June 30.”

Pittman, who was elected to his leadership position in January, covered numerous topics in his 25-minute address and Q-and-A session.

He tipped his cap to Gov. Josh Shapiro for delivering a “fairly reasonable budget product.” Pittman pointed out away of concern and disagreement with the chief among them the sheer “magnitude of expenditure” at $44.4 billion.

While expressing optimism that his caucus can work with Shapiro to find common ground, he made it clear that he is not in agreement with a plan that empties the $13 billion rainy day fund by 2027 or 2028.

“We must recognize that [the budget surplus] are one-time dollars and need to be treated as such,” he said.

“There is a red flashing light – and that red flashing light is the real estate transfer tax,” Pittman said. “The revenues that have come in from real estate transfer taxes have plummeted. To me, that’s a sign of recession times to come.”

Even with divided government in Harrisburg as Democrats claim the governor’s mansion and hold the majority in the House, Pittman said that the Senate Republican caucus “claims an electoral mandate” due to its 28-22 advantage in numbers. “It’s apparent to me that (we) will find a way to solve problems and advance the betterment of Pennsylvanians.”

He answered questions regarding the labor force, election reform, constitutional amendments, marijuana and abortion.

“We have a crisis in the labor force,” said the 46-year-old Republican. “It has shrunk dramatically. We need to reengage able body individuals into the work force. The issue is much deeper than just a select subset of employees asking the rest to subsidize tax credits through their work,” referring to Shapiro’s plan for teachers, nurses and police.

“It is undeniable that a large segment (of Commonwealth voters) does not have faith in the current process,” he said when asked about counties’ desire to have expanded time to precanvass ballots.

He said that his top priorities were transportation, bringing a budget to the table that is balanced and responsible, and an energy policy that common ground could be found upon.

Pittman also delivered a line that brought chuckles from the crowd, noting how difficult it is to represent a region of the state that has Punxsutawney Phil as one of his constituents.

  • Does the NYC Verdict Make You More or Less Likely to Vote For Trump in 2024?


    • Less Likely (36%)
    • More Likely (34%)
    • Makes No Difference (30%)

    Total Voters: 112

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