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Tag: State Legislative Targets

For the first time in over a decade, the Republican State Leadership Committee (RSLC) has a new goal for the Pennsylvania State House of Representatives – winning back the majority.

The RSLC released its “State Legislative Targets for 2024” and includes the Keystone State lower chamber, along with those in Michigan and Minnesota with razor-thin majorities held by Democrats.

Pennsylvania’s House is controlled by Democrats by a single seat, 102-101, while Michigan (56-54) and Minnesota (70-64) mean that the GOP needs to flip just nine seats combined to retake their respective majorities.

The RSLC memo lays out its mission: safeguard the GOP majorities against the onslaught of liberal spending from the far left, reclaim majorities in key battleground states, and grow the Republican party by winning seats in blue states that will continue to chip away at one-party Democrat rule. 

On the flip side, the Democratic Legislative Campaign Committee (DLCC) has Pennsylvania in its “Year of the States” roadmap memo as one of its most important states. It hopes to protect the Democratic majority in the State House, while also seeing an opportunity to flip the Pennsylvania Senate that Republicans hold a 28-22 majority.

The DLCC’s memo reads, “The Pennsylvania House’s one-seat Democratic majority has been successfully defended by the DLCC in 5 special elections so far. There will be another important special election to fill a Democratic vacancy on February 13, with control of the Pennsylvania House once again up for grabs. This seat will be a top priority for the DLCC as the chamber’s majority hangs in the balance.”

The RSLC memo talks of lessons learned from the 2023 election cycle that Republicans nationwide can implement in 2024, including targeting and turning out low-propensity voters; clarifying the GOP position on important voter issues as what they stand for, rather than what they are against, and; directing investment into state legislative races to counter outside national liberal groups.

The committee feels that Republicans’ best program in its fight against Democrats for legislative control is its Absentee Ballot and Early Voting (AB/EV) program that it first implemented in Virginia.

That program, designed to mobilize low-propensity voters, generated a 32 percent increase in absentee ballot returns in the Commonwealth over 2021 totals and converted twice as many of those voters as was hoped for.

“Joe Biden and his state allies in Harrisburg have crushed the average Pennsylvanian with inflation and it’s time for a change this November,” said Mason Di Palma, RLSC deputy communications director. “The RSLC is committed to investing the resources needed to expose Pennsylvania Democrats while supporting Republicans candidates who will fight to get the Keystone State back on track.”

For the first time in over a decade, the Republican State Leadership Committee (RSLC) has a new goal for the Pennsylvania State House of Representatives – winning back the majority.

The RSLC released its “State Legislative Targets for 2024” and includes the Keystone State lower chamber, along with those in Michigan and Minnesota with razor-thin majorities held by Democrats.

Pennsylvania’s House is controlled by Democrats by a single seat, 102-101, while Michigan (56-54) and Minnesota (70-64) mean that the GOP needs to flip just nine seats combined to retake their respective majorities.

The RSLC memo lays out its mission: safeguard the GOP majorities against the onslaught of liberal spending from the far left, reclaim majorities in key battleground states, and grow the Republican party by winning seats in blue states that will continue to chip away at one-party Democrat rule. 

On the flip side, the Democratic Legislative Campaign Committee (DLCC) has Pennsylvania in its “Year of the States” roadmap memo as one of its most important states. It hopes to protect the Democratic majority in the State House, while also seeing an opportunity to flip the Pennsylvania Senate that Republicans hold a 28-22 majority.

The DLCC’s memo reads, “The Pennsylvania House’s one-seat Democratic majority has been successfully defended by the DLCC in 5 special elections so far. There will be another important special election to fill a Democratic vacancy on February 13, with control of the Pennsylvania House once again up for grabs. This seat will be a top priority for the DLCC as the chamber’s majority hangs in the balance.”

The RSLC memo talks of lessons learned from the 2023 election cycle that Republicans nationwide can implement in 2024, including targeting and turning out low-propensity voters; clarifying the GOP position on important voter issues as what they stand for, rather than what they are against, and; directing investment into state legislative races to counter outside national liberal groups.

The committee feels that Republicans’ best program in its fight against Democrats for legislative control is its Absentee Ballot and Early Voting (AB/EV) program that it first implemented in Virginia.

That program, designed to mobilize low-propensity voters, generated a 32 percent increase in absentee ballot returns in the Commonwealth over 2021 totals and converted twice as many of those voters as was hoped for.

“Joe Biden and his state allies in Harrisburg have crushed the average Pennsylvanian with inflation and it’s time for a change this November,” said Mason Di Palma, RLSC deputy communications director. “The RSLC is committed to investing the resources needed to expose Pennsylvania Democrats while supporting Republicans candidates who will fight to get the Keystone State back on track.”

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For the first time in over a decade, the Republican State Leadership Committee (RSLC) has a new goal for the Pennsylvania State House of Representatives – winning back the majority.

The RSLC released its “State Legislative Targets for 2024” and includes the Keystone State lower chamber, along with those in Michigan and Minnesota with razor-thin majorities held by Democrats.

Pennsylvania’s House is controlled by Democrats by a single seat, 102-101, while Michigan (56-54) and Minnesota (70-64) mean that the GOP needs to flip just nine seats combined to retake their respective majorities.

The RSLC memo lays out its mission: safeguard the GOP majorities against the onslaught of liberal spending from the far left, reclaim majorities in key battleground states, and grow the Republican party by winning seats in blue states that will continue to chip away at one-party Democrat rule. 

On the flip side, the Democratic Legislative Campaign Committee (DLCC) has Pennsylvania in its “Year of the States” roadmap memo as one of its most important states. It hopes to protect the Democratic majority in the State House, while also seeing an opportunity to flip the Pennsylvania Senate that Republicans hold a 28-22 majority.

The DLCC’s memo reads, “The Pennsylvania House’s one-seat Democratic majority has been successfully defended by the DLCC in 5 special elections so far. There will be another important special election to fill a Democratic vacancy on February 13, with control of the Pennsylvania House once again up for grabs. This seat will be a top priority for the DLCC as the chamber’s majority hangs in the balance.”

The RSLC memo talks of lessons learned from the 2023 election cycle that Republicans nationwide can implement in 2024, including targeting and turning out low-propensity voters; clarifying the GOP position on important voter issues as what they stand for, rather than what they are against, and; directing investment into state legislative races to counter outside national liberal groups.

The committee feels that Republicans’ best program in its fight against Democrats for legislative control is its Absentee Ballot and Early Voting (AB/EV) program that it first implemented in Virginia.

That program, designed to mobilize low-propensity voters, generated a 32 percent increase in absentee ballot returns in the Commonwealth over 2021 totals and converted twice as many of those voters as was hoped for.

“Joe Biden and his state allies in Harrisburg have crushed the average Pennsylvanian with inflation and it’s time for a change this November,” said Mason Di Palma, RLSC deputy communications director. “The RSLC is committed to investing the resources needed to expose Pennsylvania Democrats while supporting Republicans candidates who will fight to get the Keystone State back on track.”

For the first time in over a decade, the Republican State Leadership Committee (RSLC) has a new goal for the Pennsylvania State House of Representatives – winning back the majority.

The RSLC released its “State Legislative Targets for 2024” and includes the Keystone State lower chamber, along with those in Michigan and Minnesota with razor-thin majorities held by Democrats.

Pennsylvania’s House is controlled by Democrats by a single seat, 102-101, while Michigan (56-54) and Minnesota (70-64) mean that the GOP needs to flip just nine seats combined to retake their respective majorities.

The RSLC memo lays out its mission: safeguard the GOP majorities against the onslaught of liberal spending from the far left, reclaim majorities in key battleground states, and grow the Republican party by winning seats in blue states that will continue to chip away at one-party Democrat rule. 

On the flip side, the Democratic Legislative Campaign Committee (DLCC) has Pennsylvania in its “Year of the States” roadmap memo as one of its most important states. It hopes to protect the Democratic majority in the State House, while also seeing an opportunity to flip the Pennsylvania Senate that Republicans hold a 28-22 majority.

The DLCC’s memo reads, “The Pennsylvania House’s one-seat Democratic majority has been successfully defended by the DLCC in 5 special elections so far. There will be another important special election to fill a Democratic vacancy on February 13, with control of the Pennsylvania House once again up for grabs. This seat will be a top priority for the DLCC as the chamber’s majority hangs in the balance.”

The RSLC memo talks of lessons learned from the 2023 election cycle that Republicans nationwide can implement in 2024, including targeting and turning out low-propensity voters; clarifying the GOP position on important voter issues as what they stand for, rather than what they are against, and; directing investment into state legislative races to counter outside national liberal groups.

The committee feels that Republicans’ best program in its fight against Democrats for legislative control is its Absentee Ballot and Early Voting (AB/EV) program that it first implemented in Virginia.

That program, designed to mobilize low-propensity voters, generated a 32 percent increase in absentee ballot returns in the Commonwealth over 2021 totals and converted twice as many of those voters as was hoped for.

“Joe Biden and his state allies in Harrisburg have crushed the average Pennsylvanian with inflation and it’s time for a change this November,” said Mason Di Palma, RLSC deputy communications director. “The RSLC is committed to investing the resources needed to expose Pennsylvania Democrats while supporting Republicans candidates who will fight to get the Keystone State back on track.”

  • Does the NYC Verdict Make You More or Less Likely to Vote For Trump in 2024?


    • Less Likely (36%)
    • More Likely (34%)
    • Makes No Difference (30%)

    Total Voters: 112

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