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Joe Sestak Lays Out National Security Strategy

Joe Sestak Lays Out National Security Strategy

Delivers Speech on Military, Diplomatic and Domestic Approach Critical for our Future

HARRISBURG, Pa. — On the week of the nine year anniversary of our invasion into Afghanistan, U.S. Senate candidate Joe Sestak said today the United States must reassess how it defends itself militarily, set clear objectives for success abroad and ensure we have the right domestic policies in place.

“After 31 years in the Navy, I am a firm believer in the strength and quality of our armed forces. But I also know that our military can only keep us safe – it does not make us secure,” said Joe speaking at the State Capitol.

He emphasized the importance of setting clear objectives for our national security with benchmarks for success that measure our progress in pursuing a given strategy. The need for this approach is highlighted by the situation in Afghanistan, where Joe has supported a narrow mission to neutralize the threat of Al Qaeda and eliminating their safe haven in the border regions of Pakistan.

Moving forward, Joe stresses that we must invest in enhancing our technological prowess and intelligence operations — removing the emphasis from on the size of our military — to overcome the new kind of threats our nation faces in the 21st century. Meanwhile, Joe advocates a strategy of engagement with the world that reflects an understanding that military strength is only one part of many in our overall security.

But national security begins at home, Joe added, with a robust economy that strengthens the nation as a whole and in the eyes of the international community.

With China and other countries gaining ground in fields like the new energy technology industry, Joe said leaders must be willing to work toward the practical solutions that help create jobs and allow the country to remain an economic leader.

“The truth is that our fundamental strength – and our national security – begins here at home. It’s woven into the values that define this country, and founded on the prosperity of the middle class.”

Click here to view the full prepared text of today’s speech.

Excerpts from Today’s Speech

“Nine years ago this week – on October 7, 2001, airstrikes and special operations marked the beginning of “Operation Enduring Freedom” – the American-led campaign in Afghanistan, which continues to this day.

“And at this point, as we review our focus on this conflict, I believe it’s an important opportunity to assess and properly adjust our approach to the emerging threats we face around the world.”

“Our fighting men and women are unquestionably the best and bravest on the planet. We owe them not only a set of clear objectives, and a comprehensive plan to win, but also the means to measure progress along the way.”

“In today’s world, the size of our military matters less than its overall capability – and how we posture that capability worldwide. We must focus on our ability to monitor, anticipate and know in a timely way of an adversary’s intentions or movements, so we can meet these threats more quickly, efficiently, and effectively, with correctly postured units of power.”

“From our approach in Afghanistan, to the way we utilize our military, to the need for a new era of engagement around the world: at every level, our national security depends on strong, practical leadership.

“This is a time for problem solvers – not blind ideologues. This is a time for courageous leadership that relies on every available resource to find practical solutions.”

“After 31 years in the Navy, I am a firm believer in the strength and quality of our armed forces. But I also know that our military can only keep us safe – it does not make us secure.

“The truth is that our fundamental strength – and our national security – begins here at home. It’s woven into the values that define this country, and founded on the prosperity of the middle class.”

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