Category: Elections

updated December 1, 12:01 p.m.

And the winners are … not yet certified.

Not yet certified by all 67 counties in the Commonwealth, although 59 have certified their vote totals.

What’s the holdup?

Pennsylvania election law states that county Boards of Election are “to receive from district election officers the returns of all primaries and elections, to canvass and compute the same, and to certify, no later than the third Monday following the primary or election, the results thereof to the Secretary of the Commonwealth, as may be provided by law, and to such other authorities as may be provided by law. The certification shall include the number of votes received in each election district by each candidate for the General Assembly.”

The third Monday after the election was yesterday – November 28.

“The Department of State is aware of several recount petitions filed in multiple counties across the commonwealth,” said spokesperson Ellen Lyon. “Counties have a statutory duty to certify returns. Only in the event of a legally valid and properly filed recount petition may a county withhold certification of the election returns for an office that is the subject of the recount. Counties should certify races that are not subject to such a properly filed recount petition. This partial certification process has been done before and allows the Secretary to certify those races not impacted by legitimate recount petitions.”

DOS reviews and compiles the official returns that enables the Secretary of the Commonwealth to certify the final results for a particular office. Lyon said “Though there is no specific statutory deadline for the Secretary of the Commonwealth to certify election returns, Pennsylvania legislative terms begin in December, and the department is expected to certify returns to Congress by mid-December.”

The following 59 counties have indicated that their results are official on county websites or responded via email that they have certified their results. The remaining eight counties have yet to indicate that their results are official.

  1. Adams *
  2. Allegheny (12 precincts remaining until judge rules on recount petitions)
  3. Armstrong
  4. Beaver *
  5. Bedford *
  6. Bradford
  7. Butler
  8. Cambria
  9. Cameron *
  10. Carbon
  11. Centre
  12. Chester
  13. Clearfield *
  14. Clinton
  15. Crawford
  16. Cumberland *
  17. Dauphin
  18. Delaware
  19. Elk
  20. Erie
  21. Fayette
  22. Forest *
  23. Franklin
  24. Greene *
  25. Huntingdon
  26. Indiana
  27. Jefferson
  28. Juniata
  29. Lackawanna
  30. Lancaster
  31. Lawrence
  32. Lebanon
  33. Lehigh
  34. Luzerne
  35. Lycoming
  36. McKean
  37. Mercer
  38. Mifflin *
  39. Monroe
  40. Montgomery
  41. Montour
  42. Northampton
  43. Northumberland *
  44. Perry
  45. Pike
  46. Potter *
  47. Schuylkill
  48. Snyder *
  49. Somerset
  50. Sullivan
  51. Tioga
  52. Union
  53. Venango *
  54. Warren
  55. Washington
  56. Wayne *
  57. Westmoreland * (302 of 307 precincts)
  58. Wyoming
  59. York

 

Outstanding

  1. Berks
  2. Blair
  3. Bucks
  4. Clarion
  5. Columbia
  6. Fulton
  7. Philadelphia
  8. Susquehanna

 

* added since original post

Lyon also said that “Regarding Allegheny County, the department does not have any comment at this time. We will review what Allegheny submits to the department and then decide next steps.”

updated December 1, 12:01 p.m.

And the winners are … not yet certified.

Not yet certified by all 67 counties in the Commonwealth, although 59 have certified their vote totals.

What’s the holdup?

Pennsylvania election law states that county Boards of Election are “to receive from district election officers the returns of all primaries and elections, to canvass and compute the same, and to certify, no later than the third Monday following the primary or election, the results thereof to the Secretary of the Commonwealth, as may be provided by law, and to such other authorities as may be provided by law. The certification shall include the number of votes received in each election district by each candidate for the General Assembly.”

The third Monday after the election was yesterday – November 28.

“The Department of State is aware of several recount petitions filed in multiple counties across the commonwealth,” said spokesperson Ellen Lyon. “Counties have a statutory duty to certify returns. Only in the event of a legally valid and properly filed recount petition may a county withhold certification of the election returns for an office that is the subject of the recount. Counties should certify races that are not subject to such a properly filed recount petition. This partial certification process has been done before and allows the Secretary to certify those races not impacted by legitimate recount petitions.”

DOS reviews and compiles the official returns that enables the Secretary of the Commonwealth to certify the final results for a particular office. Lyon said “Though there is no specific statutory deadline for the Secretary of the Commonwealth to certify election returns, Pennsylvania legislative terms begin in December, and the department is expected to certify returns to Congress by mid-December.”

The following 59 counties have indicated that their results are official on county websites or responded via email that they have certified their results. The remaining eight counties have yet to indicate that their results are official.

  1. Adams *
  2. Allegheny (12 precincts remaining until judge rules on recount petitions)
  3. Armstrong
  4. Beaver *
  5. Bedford *
  6. Bradford
  7. Butler
  8. Cambria
  9. Cameron *
  10. Carbon
  11. Centre
  12. Chester
  13. Clearfield *
  14. Clinton
  15. Crawford
  16. Cumberland *
  17. Dauphin
  18. Delaware
  19. Elk
  20. Erie
  21. Fayette
  22. Forest *
  23. Franklin
  24. Greene *
  25. Huntingdon
  26. Indiana
  27. Jefferson
  28. Juniata
  29. Lackawanna
  30. Lancaster
  31. Lawrence
  32. Lebanon
  33. Lehigh
  34. Luzerne
  35. Lycoming
  36. McKean
  37. Mercer
  38. Mifflin *
  39. Monroe
  40. Montgomery
  41. Montour
  42. Northampton
  43. Northumberland *
  44. Perry
  45. Pike
  46. Potter *
  47. Schuylkill
  48. Snyder *
  49. Somerset
  50. Sullivan
  51. Tioga
  52. Union
  53. Venango *
  54. Warren
  55. Washington
  56. Wayne *
  57. Westmoreland * (302 of 307 precincts)
  58. Wyoming
  59. York

 

Outstanding

  1. Berks
  2. Blair
  3. Bucks
  4. Clarion
  5. Columbia
  6. Fulton
  7. Philadelphia
  8. Susquehanna

 

* added since original post

Lyon also said that “Regarding Allegheny County, the department does not have any comment at this time. We will review what Allegheny submits to the department and then decide next steps.”

Email:

updated December 1, 12:01 p.m.

And the winners are … not yet certified.

Not yet certified by all 67 counties in the Commonwealth, although 59 have certified their vote totals.

What’s the holdup?

Pennsylvania election law states that county Boards of Election are “to receive from district election officers the returns of all primaries and elections, to canvass and compute the same, and to certify, no later than the third Monday following the primary or election, the results thereof to the Secretary of the Commonwealth, as may be provided by law, and to such other authorities as may be provided by law. The certification shall include the number of votes received in each election district by each candidate for the General Assembly.”

The third Monday after the election was yesterday – November 28.

“The Department of State is aware of several recount petitions filed in multiple counties across the commonwealth,” said spokesperson Ellen Lyon. “Counties have a statutory duty to certify returns. Only in the event of a legally valid and properly filed recount petition may a county withhold certification of the election returns for an office that is the subject of the recount. Counties should certify races that are not subject to such a properly filed recount petition. This partial certification process has been done before and allows the Secretary to certify those races not impacted by legitimate recount petitions.”

DOS reviews and compiles the official returns that enables the Secretary of the Commonwealth to certify the final results for a particular office. Lyon said “Though there is no specific statutory deadline for the Secretary of the Commonwealth to certify election returns, Pennsylvania legislative terms begin in December, and the department is expected to certify returns to Congress by mid-December.”

The following 59 counties have indicated that their results are official on county websites or responded via email that they have certified their results. The remaining eight counties have yet to indicate that their results are official.

  1. Adams *
  2. Allegheny (12 precincts remaining until judge rules on recount petitions)
  3. Armstrong
  4. Beaver *
  5. Bedford *
  6. Bradford
  7. Butler
  8. Cambria
  9. Cameron *
  10. Carbon
  11. Centre
  12. Chester
  13. Clearfield *
  14. Clinton
  15. Crawford
  16. Cumberland *
  17. Dauphin
  18. Delaware
  19. Elk
  20. Erie
  21. Fayette
  22. Forest *
  23. Franklin
  24. Greene *
  25. Huntingdon
  26. Indiana
  27. Jefferson
  28. Juniata
  29. Lackawanna
  30. Lancaster
  31. Lawrence
  32. Lebanon
  33. Lehigh
  34. Luzerne
  35. Lycoming
  36. McKean
  37. Mercer
  38. Mifflin *
  39. Monroe
  40. Montgomery
  41. Montour
  42. Northampton
  43. Northumberland *
  44. Perry
  45. Pike
  46. Potter *
  47. Schuylkill
  48. Snyder *
  49. Somerset
  50. Sullivan
  51. Tioga
  52. Union
  53. Venango *
  54. Warren
  55. Washington
  56. Wayne *
  57. Westmoreland * (302 of 307 precincts)
  58. Wyoming
  59. York

 

Outstanding

  1. Berks
  2. Blair
  3. Bucks
  4. Clarion
  5. Columbia
  6. Fulton
  7. Philadelphia
  8. Susquehanna

 

* added since original post

Lyon also said that “Regarding Allegheny County, the department does not have any comment at this time. We will review what Allegheny submits to the department and then decide next steps.”

updated December 1, 12:01 p.m.

And the winners are … not yet certified.

Not yet certified by all 67 counties in the Commonwealth, although 59 have certified their vote totals.

What’s the holdup?

Pennsylvania election law states that county Boards of Election are “to receive from district election officers the returns of all primaries and elections, to canvass and compute the same, and to certify, no later than the third Monday following the primary or election, the results thereof to the Secretary of the Commonwealth, as may be provided by law, and to such other authorities as may be provided by law. The certification shall include the number of votes received in each election district by each candidate for the General Assembly.”

The third Monday after the election was yesterday – November 28.

“The Department of State is aware of several recount petitions filed in multiple counties across the commonwealth,” said spokesperson Ellen Lyon. “Counties have a statutory duty to certify returns. Only in the event of a legally valid and properly filed recount petition may a county withhold certification of the election returns for an office that is the subject of the recount. Counties should certify races that are not subject to such a properly filed recount petition. This partial certification process has been done before and allows the Secretary to certify those races not impacted by legitimate recount petitions.”

DOS reviews and compiles the official returns that enables the Secretary of the Commonwealth to certify the final results for a particular office. Lyon said “Though there is no specific statutory deadline for the Secretary of the Commonwealth to certify election returns, Pennsylvania legislative terms begin in December, and the department is expected to certify returns to Congress by mid-December.”

The following 59 counties have indicated that their results are official on county websites or responded via email that they have certified their results. The remaining eight counties have yet to indicate that their results are official.

  1. Adams *
  2. Allegheny (12 precincts remaining until judge rules on recount petitions)
  3. Armstrong
  4. Beaver *
  5. Bedford *
  6. Bradford
  7. Butler
  8. Cambria
  9. Cameron *
  10. Carbon
  11. Centre
  12. Chester
  13. Clearfield *
  14. Clinton
  15. Crawford
  16. Cumberland *
  17. Dauphin
  18. Delaware
  19. Elk
  20. Erie
  21. Fayette
  22. Forest *
  23. Franklin
  24. Greene *
  25. Huntingdon
  26. Indiana
  27. Jefferson
  28. Juniata
  29. Lackawanna
  30. Lancaster
  31. Lawrence
  32. Lebanon
  33. Lehigh
  34. Luzerne
  35. Lycoming
  36. McKean
  37. Mercer
  38. Mifflin *
  39. Monroe
  40. Montgomery
  41. Montour
  42. Northampton
  43. Northumberland *
  44. Perry
  45. Pike
  46. Potter *
  47. Schuylkill
  48. Snyder *
  49. Somerset
  50. Sullivan
  51. Tioga
  52. Union
  53. Venango *
  54. Warren
  55. Washington
  56. Wayne *
  57. Westmoreland * (302 of 307 precincts)
  58. Wyoming
  59. York

 

Outstanding

  1. Berks
  2. Blair
  3. Bucks
  4. Clarion
  5. Columbia
  6. Fulton
  7. Philadelphia
  8. Susquehanna

 

* added since original post

Lyon also said that “Regarding Allegheny County, the department does not have any comment at this time. We will review what Allegheny submits to the department and then decide next steps.”

  • When Should The Special Elections For The PA House Be Held?


    • May 16, 2023 (Primary Day) (51%)
    • March, 2023 (47%)
    • April, 2023 (2%)

    Total Voters: 173

    Loading ... Loading ...
Continue to Browser

PoliticsPA

To install tap and choose
Add to Home Screen